The Good Confession

I charge you before God, He making all things alive, and Christ Jesus, He witnessing the good confession to Pontius Pilate…
1 Timothy 6:13 (LITV)

With these words Paul exposes the folly of our trust in the understanding of the mere creeds and so-called “confessions” by which we have so often defined our faith. For what great theological oration did Christ Jesus give before Pilate? Yet it says, “He witnessed the good confession before Pontius Pilate.” A witness is one who has lived that of which they speak; and the life of which they speak is their confession. Christ witnessed the good confession to Pilate; Christ’s confession was the very Life of God by which He was obedient to His Father in all things.

The good confession of which He witnssed was that He was the Son of God in the flesh. Ours is likewise to be that that same Life of the Son of God is being manifested in the life of our own flesh. Just as God and man were fully present in Christ before Pilate, so also our witness to Him shall be no witness at all until the substance of our real lives is being transfigured by the substance of God’s real Life working in us through the obedience of faith.

The witness which John makes of the apostles’ confession is, “That which we have seen and heard, declare we unto you…” In God’s appointed order, there is no discrepancy, though there be a distinction, between His Word and Christ Himself. Christ is the Word of God. If then we be Christ’s, and His word dwells in us, how can we not be constrained by that Word? “Why do you call Me “Lord, Lord,” and not do the things I say?” We have taken the distinction between command and Commander as justification for the glaring discrepancy between them in our own lives. But God does not abide such hypocrisy.

The incarnation of Christ Jesus is in itself the ultimate rebuke for our rending of the Word spoken from the Word lived. For in Him the Word was born a man, true Divinity elevating true humanity in Christ to its proper place in absolute harmony with God; so that those likewise born again of His Spirit from above might become partakers in the same resurrection life TODAY.

For how does John describe those who abide not in that Life?

By this we know the Spirit of God: every spirit which confesses that Jesus Christ IS come in the flesh is from God. And every spirit which does not confess that Jesus Christ IS come in the flesh is not from God; this is the antichrist which you heard is coming, and now is already in the world.
1 John 4:2-3

Notice how John says that it is a spirit which either confesses or denies the good confession. For he who confesses is he in whom righteousness is seen in the flesh, and he is from God; but he who denies is he in whom righteousness is not found in the flesh, and that one is not from God. In the case of the first spirit, it witnesses truly of that which it has seen and heard: which is the Word of Life; and in them the Life is manifest. But in the case of the second spirit, they bear witness of no such Life in the flesh; and their words are empty, because the Life, which is the good confession, is not manifest in them. Such is the spirit of antichrist: it is contrary to Christ’s Life working in us, though we speak His Name.

And again, regarding this second spirit which confesses not: it could be a demon, or it could be the spirit of a man, and there would be no difference. For the true confession that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is a life being evidently lived in the flesh “by the faith OF the Son of God.” (Gal 2:20). Does the faith of Jesus Christ Himself ever fail? That is the faith by which we are to be living. Religion stops at faith in Christ; but the righteousness of God is “through the faith OF Jesus Christ toward all and upon all those believing…” (Rom 3:22)

John, as he does throughout his first letter, is saying that those who have the Life of Christ ought to walk even as Christ walked: who, though being God, became a man, so that we, being men, might become “the righteousness of God in Him.”

Such is the good confession. To truly confess His name is to have His Life at work even in our life in the flesh, just as He was always about His Father in His own flesh.

If we receive the witness of men, the witness of God is greater; because this is the witness of God which He has witnessed about His Son:
The one believing in the Son of God has the witness in himself.
The one not believing God has made Him a liar, because he has not believed in the witness which God has witnessed concerning His Son.
And this is the witness: that God gave us everlasting life, and this life is in His Son.
1 John 5:9-11 (LITV)

Indeed, I tell you truly: he that believes in Me, the works which I do, that one shall do also, and greater than these he will do, because I go to My Father.
John 14:12 (LITV)

Reflections Upon Logos

First, a short list of basic meanings for Logos (Gk. λόγος):

a saying, speaking, speech, mode of speaking, eloquence, discourse; conversation, talk; word, expression; assertion; principle, maxim; proverb; oracle; promise; order, command; proposal; condition, agreement; stipulation, decision; pretext; thought, reason, reckoning, computation, reflection, deliberation, account; cause, end; argument, demonstration; meaning, value; proportion; Christ.


Man’s tendency to speculate that there was chaos in the beginning is simply his philisophical attempt to legitimize the presence of sin and darkness within his own soul. For he knows where he came from, and where he ought to be going; but he loves the darknes instead of the light, because his deeds are evil.

And we have been given this great revelation:

In the beginning was Logos:
with God was Logos,
and Logos was God.

Logos cannot proceed from chaos; chaos is by very definition of its nature the deviation from Logos. Logos cannot but only be first and primary.

For there to even be chaos, there must already subsist either existence and/or being distinct from God which is capable of rejecting Logos, since God Himself is not a God of confusion. The Spirit of Christ declares that in the beginning only Logos was, and Logos was God. Such a decription leaves no room for any existence or being outside of Him “before” creation.

Neither, then, in the beginning, could there have yet been chaos; since there only was God, who is Logos, within whom no deviation can be. And where there is found chaos and disorder, the true beginning has to have come before it, and then a transgression. For chaos is the transgression of Logos.

As the scripture says:

In the beginning, God
…and God created…

By this we see clearly that only God, and that which God creates, and the doings of either, can be spoken of; for elsewise nothing is. It is therefore somewhat misleading when we declare that God created ex-nihilo (“out of nothing”); since nothing is not existent, and nothing is not being. Existence derives from preexistence; being derives from being. Does not nature itself teach us this? For truly God is said to have created – as we might axiomize in Greek – ektós-theos (“out of God”); since that which is cannot proceed from that which is not.

All things came into being through Him, and without Him not even one thing came into being that has come into being. (LITV)

“Without Him” means apart from, beside, and includes the meaning of outside of. That which He created, He did not create from outside of Himself; but rather from within Himself. For as it states clearly, apart from Himself there became neither existence nor being. Hence, all things came into being “through” Him, for He is the matrix of all possible existence and of all possible being. Therefore, the nature of the created order, even with disorder now present, unmistakably illustrates His eternal truth because it still bears the marks of the same mystery of He who made it.

And He is before all things, and all things consist in Him.
Colossians 1:17 (LITV)

Creation is derivitive of God Himself. The propensity to avoid this truth reveals the very separation of the creature from God which occured at the fall. Now, this is not a denial of “the many” (the distinction of creation from God) as much as it is neither a denial of “the One” (the consistence of creation through God). For sin is manifested in both denials; because sin itself is the division of the many from the One (the creation from the Creator). For though we are to distinguish between them, they are not meant to be divided.

To deny the One for the many, or to deny the many for the One, is to embrace the very deviation which divided the two. That is the exact definition of heresy. We might clumsily label these two denials of God’s order “pantheism” and “radical individualism;” but they are both manifestations of the same separation of the creature from the Creator: and they both therefore magnify the creature at the expense of the Creator. The one error is not better than the other.

Upon this separation, Logos is exchanged for the constantly disordering motion of chaos; yet only in tge life of the creature. For although God created man through Logos; He tasked them to willingly remain in Logos, which they have not. Disorder cannot touch God because He is Logos; He is immovable: so that whatever deviates from His Way removes itself from Him, and He Himself is not changed.

The disorder in ourselves is not to be embraced, nor even tolerated, but rather expelled. It is not natural to God; therefore we know that it ought not be natural to ourselves. Man knows where he came from, and where he should be going.

Logos preexisted chaos, True Life preexisted death; and death will again be swallowed up in victory for all who live through and in Him – He who both preceded and succeeded death. He is the beginning and the end.

The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overtake it.

After all, how could it?

Awake, O sleeper, arise from death; and Christ will give you light.

If we say that we have not sinned, we make Him a liar, and His Logos is not in us.
1 John 1:10

“Come and Die”

As they were going along the road, someone said to Him, “I will follow you wherever you go.” And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay His head.”
Luke 9:57-58 (ESV)

Men look for their own sense of purpose; but God wants to take His own beyond this into walking in the lively substance of He who is the very purpose. Your hopes of success or earthly blessing will not get you through the onslaught of the Devil when he with heaven’s approval tears all your hopes and dreams into pieces. And then, poor soul, what will you do? How long will you shake your fist at God? Not even the prospect of the grave shall give you solace thereafter, though you wished it would; for you have dug it far too shallow.

“But though He cause grief, yet will He have compassion according to the multitude of His mercies.” (Lam 3:32) To be raised up most fully into the heavens, you must pass most fully through the blackness of death itself. The cross’s work is not being finished until it has begun finishing you. You must be being crucified into the Life which is deeper than a mere sense of your own purpose. You must walk through hell’s onslaught, through the terrors of death itself; holding fast your flame before the cold black stare of Satan’s nothingness. Your sense of purpose is only as good as your ability to keep it; but if you would go to deeper and higher places with God, His depths and heights will demand of you its demise: for the kingdom of God is where men and their own aspirations go to die.

And He said to all, “If anyone would come after Me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow Me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for My sake will save it.
Luke 9:23-24 (ESV)

God in Christ brings us into His purpose by bringing us beyond ourselves – if only we will allow His death to be ours in this life daily; so that His very Life might reign in us, and consequently, we in His Life. God Himself must become our only means to His only ends; our only vision and our only Hope beyond hope. If you have another plan, may God shatter it beyond repair! O, let nothing be of any use to us but the keeping of the presence of God with us! It costs absolutely everything else; but there is no other way. Only then are we no longer entrapped in this world by the selfishness of seeking our own things; only then are we sufficiently broken vessels to pour forth the sweet aroma of Christ’s work for the glory of God alone.

Obedience to God as the means of finding our own sense of purpose is idolatry. His ministration will not be mocked even by what men call “ministries.” But obedience to God because He is worthy is its own reward to the humble; for it is the power of God moving within a man beyond that man’s capabilities, and it is the Spirit of God unhindered even by a man’s most seemingly pious desires. It is the legacy of those who have counted all as loss; it is the result of men reaching the end of their own rope, and finally letting go.

There is nothing more embittering than the anguish of defeat and loss without purpose. But there is nothing sweeter to the soul than the continual repentance whose heavenly joy is birthed by God’s own hand through said anguish; which finds strength beyond strength in the admittance of defeat; whose purpose is wrapped up in the mystery of Godliness at the willing loss of all else.

Let this mind be in us, which was also in Christ Jesus.

Quote – Ignatius Of Antioch

“Let not those who seem worthy of credit, but teach strange doctrines, fill you with apprehension. Stand firm, as does an anvil which is beaten. It is the part of a noble athlete to be wounded, and yet to conquer. And especially, we ought to bear all things for the sake of God, that He also may bear with us. Be ever becoming more zealous than what you are. Weigh carefully the times. Look for Him who is above all time, eternal and invisible, yet who became visible for our sakes; impalpable and impassible, yet who became passible on our account; and who in every kind of way suffered for our sakes.”
– Ignatius of Antioch, in his letter to Polycarp