Mocking the Grace of God

And why not do evil that good may come? – as some people slanderously charge us with saying. Their condemnation is just.
Romans 3:8

When men charge the grace of God with being such a low and powerless thing, they reveal the self-made religion of their wicked hearts and fail to truly behold His grace. For whether they desire to get away with overt sensual wickedness, or they intend to obtain God’s mercy through human works, in both cases they are laying the exact same charge against His grace: the charge of insufficency.

To both, I answer the same:
The strength of sin is not grace.
Behold now the cross, and tremble.

“Behold! The Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!”

God is light, and in Him is no darkness at all. Be found therefore in Him, that He be found in you. For the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness does not overtake it.

For God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.
2 Corinthians 4:6

He Draws All Men

“No man can come to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw him:
and I will raise him up at the last day.”

John 6:44

It is by the activity of Satan that we have become ignorant of whom the Father draws – though Jesus Himself answered the matter plainly and indeed died to fulfill it…

“And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto me.”
This he said, signifying what death he should die.

John 12:32-33

The drawing of the Father is through Jesus Christ unto every man, that they might come to Him. He draws all men; but not all come to Him. Every man who comes to Him has been drawn; not every man drawn comes to Him

For “everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.” How then will they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone preaching? And how are they to preach unless they are sent? As it is written, “How beautiful are the feet of those who preach the good news!” But they have not all obeyed the gospel. For Isaiah says, “Lord, who has believed what he has heard from us?” So faith comes from hearing, and hearing through the word of Christ. But I ask, have they not heard? Indeed they have, for “Their voice has gone out to all the earth, and their words to the ends of the world.”
Romans 10:13-18

And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for ours only,
but also for the sins of the whole world.

1 John 2:2

…that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation.
2 Corinthians 5:19

Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ.
Colossians 2:8

One House, Two Sons

“But what do you think? A man had two sons, and he came to the first, and said, ‘Son, go work today in my vineyard.’ He answered, ‘I will not,’ but afterward he changed his mind, and went. He came to the second, and said the same thing. He answered, ‘I go, sir,’ but he didn’t go. Which of the two did the will of his father?” They said to him, “The first.” Jesus said to them, “Most certainly I tell you that the tax collectors and the prostitutes are entering into God’s Kingdom before you. For John came to you in the way of righteousness, and you didn’t believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes believed him. When you saw it, you didn’t even repent afterward, that you might believe him.”
Matthew 21:28-32

While religious men waste precious time boasting of their good intentions, those who boast in the Lord Jesus Christ alone perform His will.

 

There are two kinds of sons in God’s house…

The one promises his own faithfulness and thereby cannot not deliver; the other beholds God’s faithfulness and thereby learns faithfulness.

The one looks to his good works as the assurance of things hoped for; the other finds faith itself to be that assurance.

The one tries to discern if he is in the faith though he already believed the gospel; the other knows that he is in the faith because he believes and thereby hears the Spirit bearing witness.

The one supposes to remain in Christ by his new-found goodness, and is overcome by his own weakness; the other abides in Christ’s love, and is overcome by His strength.

The one works with fear and torment in order keep his salvation as though it were on loan; the other learns with fear and trembling to work out his salvation, the free gift of God.

The one is persuaded that he must be able to keep that which Christ Jesus entrusted to him against the day of judgement; the other is persuaded that Christ Jesus is able to keep the thing entrusted to God in Christ against that day.

 

He whose heart is pure does not approach God on the terms of pretense; for he knows that God has not called him into pretense, but rather upon a settled surety.

It is Christ who shall present us to Himself, not ourselves. Men are obsessed with their own presentation; and through this, the Devil distracts them from the only One who can ever wash them clean.

“You blind Pharisee, first clean the inside of the cup and of the platter, that its outside may become clean also.”

“If I don’t wash you, you have no part with Me.”

“Vincēbar” – Inverting Invictus

A rebuttal of William Ernest Henley’s famous and Godless poem, “Invictus” (Latin: “unconquerable”).

 

“VINCĒBAR”
(Latin: “I, The Conquered & Being Conquered”)

Into the night that covered me,
Black as the pit which held me whole,
He became sin that He might be
The conqueror of my soul.

From blinding clutch of Satan’s bands,
I heard His voice and cried aloud
Then saw His blood on my own hands,
His face was marred, His head thorn-crowned.

Beyond the veil, He brought me near.
Through horror He my ransom paid,
That now in me He finds revere
And by His grace makes unafraid.

He brought me through the straitest gate,
He purged of punishments the scroll.
He is the Master of my fate:
He is the Captain of my soul.

 

Vincēbar” – Latin: first-person singular imperfect passive indicative of vincō (“conquer”).

For context, the poem “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley can be viewed HERE.