Bleed As Much As You Cry

We need men of compassion, not merely empathy.

Empathy is good to have, but it becomes a form of vanity when not fulfilled in the substantive work of compassion.

I may feel the weight of every trouble and pain in this world, and be awakened to the horror of sin and the state of God’s people, and presumptuously condemn my brother for seeming in my eyes to be insensitive to it; and if God is merciful, then perhaps that same brother will have compassion upon my wretched soul, and not utterly abandon me for my insufferable blindness, that perhaps I might see my own error. For in the feelings of empathy we may presume to have great discernment; but by the grounded hand of compassion this vanity is shattered, and true discernment is built through the sharpening of iron.

Longsuffering is the mystery of compassion. I may feel all the sorrow of righteous Job, and sense the injustice against me as Job did against the ill counsel of his friends; yet still, it is the compassion of the Almighty which comes to me and says, “Gird up now thy loins like a man; for I will demand of thee, and answer thou ME.” For although his friends condemned him unjustly, Job then reactively argued to justify himself. It was the Lord’s steep rebuke of this sinful attitude which restored Job to offer a sacrifice on behalf of his friends. Those who vindicate themselves cannot practice compassion.

For what good is it to experience the privilege of feeling the burdens of the Lord, only to cast them heavily upon another without pity? The Lord shares His burdens not for us to sanctimoniously pontificate about them that we may be noticed by heaven for our mere sensitivity in spiritual things, as if that itself were the pinnacle of consecration; but rather for us to soberly act upon it before the Lord, in the discretion of the true compassion of a grown man who seeks no recognition even from his brothers.

Anyone who takes this to be a diminishment of the weight and importance of feeling God’s sense of things, is simply immature in this regard. For this is not a diminishment of that vital intercessory role, but rather an exhortation to properly fulfill it. Neither is this a rail against the existence of spiritual empathy’s emotional expression within us, but rather an exhortation that we hold it in a sound presence of mind: acting upon that which is from God, and beating into submission that which arises from the lusts and pride of life.

Godly compassion is the tangible fulfillment of spiritual empathy through sober action on behalf of another’s wellbeing – especially spiritual wellbeing. Therefore it will give mercy where none would have expected, and exhort where few would have desired or thought necessary. It needs make little sense to anyone except those walking in its obedience. It may appear exeedingly soft to the hardhearted and overly stoic to the emotionally incontinent. Yet it is not simply a middle-ground, but is truly an altogether higher expression of God’s love in the willingly wounded hands of Jesus. The compassion of Christ is inextricably tied to His longsuffering towards we who pierced Him.

“And Jesus, moved with compassion,
put forth His hand…”

Bleed as much as you cry, or stop crying.

Thought – True Sanctity

It is not merely the christian’s outward image of apparent piety that draws others into the orbit of Christ. It is rather the gravity of Christ’s likeness permeating his being, and is thus evident without any need for the artificial projections of sanctimony.

Sanctimony is the great enemy of sanctity.

Sanctity is not a thing seen, but is rather a state of transparency revealing the likeness of Christ beneath the surface of a man who testifies not of himself. Now, this transparency of character is not the publishing of one’s every thought, whether good or evil; it is much rather a forgetting of that very tree of knowledge for a meditation – a meditation in every deed – upon the Giver of Life.

For it is the singleness of mind toward Christ, and not the upkeep of a spiritual image, which truly sanctifies. Let men, and even brethren, see whatever they see; but let us see God, and be content. Let us be satisfied not merely with His good words, but even with His likeness, concerning which all words fall short.


To what then shall I compare the people of this generation, and what are they like? They are like children sitting in the marketplace and calling out to one another, who say, ‘We played the flute for you and you did not dance; we sang a lament and you did not weep.’

For John the Baptist has come not eating bread or drinking wine, and you say, ‘He has a demon!’ The Son of Man has come eating and drinking, and you say, ‘Behold, a man who is a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’

And wisdom is vindicated by all her children.

Luke 7:31-35 (LEB)


The Cycle Of Christian Idolatry

God gives Life to men,
who write good books,
which instruct good men,
who teach other men about those books,
which then replace God Himself,
who always finds men,
who have lost God,
who again gives Life to men,
who all need to stop being such idolaters of good men and good books, let alone bad ones.

But the anointing that you received from Him abides in you, and you have no need that anyone should teach you. But as His anointing teaches you about everything, and is true, and is no lie – just as it has taught you, abide in Him.
1 John 2:27 (ESV)

Choice & the Sanctifying of the Will

Free will is not merely the ability to choose between good and evil: for that is merely freedom of choice, which every man possesses. But the man whose will is truly free is able to choose between multiple goods, and also become learned in discerning the most virtuous.

For choice, being an external impersonal principle, has no personal moral quality; whereas the will which performs the choosing is indeed held accountable, as it is a faculty of persons. The heart of this matter lies in the allegiance of the will, not in whether or not men are freely allowed to choose – for indeed they all are. The will is swayed much by the desire of the soul; so that the more sanctified the soul, the less it considers evil to even be a viable option, and the more goods from the providential hand of God are then opened to its discretion.

Therefore, the most perfectly free will would be that which beholds both good and evil, but chooses that which is only good. Or, to cast this as the choice in the garden according to philosophical terms: the most perfectly free wil chooses the Tree of Life over the Tree of False Dialectics; the latter being “knowledge, falsely so-called”.

Men come to Christ on their part by choice; but they remain obedient in Him on their part by the freeing of the will from sinful desire, through the renewing of their mind according to His Word, which teaches them every good thing, communicating to them the very Life of God.

Philosophy A.D.

Reason alone cannot justify its own existence; and the philisophical impass of existence itself ever convicts the soul. Therefore God, the “unmoved mover” of the great philosophers, cannot simply be thought thinking itself, as they sometimes concluded.

For although there may be mind without thought, there cannot be thought without mind; and a mind which conceives of persons must know and experience personhood as much or more so than those conceived of. Yet also, if we are all merely thoughts in a greater mind, as some have concluded, then we ourselves may all be decieved in supposing that our thoughts are truly thoughts at all; and then our own “thoughts” about that very matter are also in vain, and, as likely as not, another layer of deception: and why then do we so speculate, and that willfully? We should then rightly abondon the whole discourse, and immediately attempt to discover what lies beyond this veil of tears through self-inflicted death!

Yet does it not burn deeply within our souls, that the reason by which we reason must have definite origin and definite purpose? And does not death also loom as a certain judgement over the soul, for good or for ill?

Therefore, we shall not speculate upon things which in themselves necessitate the meaninglessness of themselves; for this is madness, and we know that there is a good, and a true, as it has been imprinted upon us within and without, though our eyes have been cut off from its more explicit light. And that light without is what we ought to seek from within, seeing that our own light within has already proven itself quite unworthy even to be sought from without.

Now, if the good and the true of that greater mind aforementioned shall be truly known, it must be more than a force of unseen nature: it must be the nature and character of a being who can be known not only as a mind but more importantly as a person; for a mind without personhood cannot create persons, only thoughts. Yet man is a person; and if we are speaking of the ultimate God at all, then we are speaking of man’s creator, who must therefore be a person – or else we speak of no god concerning man at all, but only of what is neither relevant nor existent (except in thought), and so deceive ourselves before we have scarcely begun to consider the matter.

For if man is a personal being – and we step into madness to deny such – then the good and true which is meant for him must have a like example to him in order to be truly known by him. If the good and true is only a force of unseen nature, then man, who is a personal being, can neither discover nor relate to it; and such is either not good and not true, or is at least not meant for him, since, being impersonal, it does not concern his person. Therefore, the good and true that is meant for him is the good and true found in a being relating to him personally. The great absurdity of the ages is that man, a manifestly triune being, scrambles to prove that a greater triune being cannot have created him. For, any good and true that is relevant to man, and especially the ultimate and transcendent, depends not merely upon the existence of that good and true as God, but upon that God being a person whose nature and character defines that very good and true, for which the created man longs, knowingly or unknowingly.

Therefore, as Christians, unless the person of Jesus Christ is our assumed presupposition in all argumentation, then all our philosophizing is in vain, try as Aquinas might to convince himself otherwise. His predecessors knew better.


“For I do not understand in order that I may believe, but I believe in order to understand. For this also I believe – that unless I believe I shall not understand.”
– Anselm of Canterbury


The Person of Christ cannot be arrived at by outside wisdom: as all wisdom proceeds from Him. He cannot be reasoned to by outside knowledge: as all knowledge is hidden in Him from the wise. He cannot be found through the courses of the human mind: as true right-mindedness subsists only in Him through relationship.

How then shall anyone be saved through our apologetic?

They shall not; nor have they ever been.

For it is not our apologetic through which any are saved; but through the power of the God who knows men. The faith of Christ is the gift of God, and the apologetic is only the confirmation of the mind of the heart already being enlightened. Apologetics may at times be an instrument of the Spirit for the unbeliever, but they are a far more useful instrument for the believer.

Divine faith is not the fruit of true reason: true reason is the fruit of divine faith. Reason may discover by omission the chasm at its center, which is faith; but even so, it cannot fill that chasm with said faith – which is the work of God’s Spirit. The faith of Jesus Christ has root in the source of all things, God the Father, the transcendent, yet personal, uncreated God who subsits in Himself, who is “that than which none is greater,” regardless of our own failing conceptions or incomplete knowledge of Him.

Those who claim that they have arrived at, reasoned to, or found Jesus Christ by means of excellent philosophy fall into two categories: firstly, those who have not truly found Him, but only a concept of Him befitting their minds; or secondly, those who have truly been found by His faith, yet are still too proud to give Him the glory in their intellect.

These things we also speak, not in words which man’s wisdom teaches but which the Holy Spirit teaches, comparing spiritual things with spiritual.
[Or, “interpreting spiritual truths to those who are spiritual.”]
1 Corinthians 2:13 (NKJV)

The above words of the apostle leave us no intermediary stepping-stone between the carnal mind and the spiritual mind that can be relied upon; no bridge between reason and revelation that can be crossed; no means of God-pleasing enlightenment except that which the Holy Spirit Himself works upon the soul. A man is either carnal or spiritual; he will either understand spiritual things or he will not; and the knowledge of God will either be conceptual, unto his puffing up, or experiential, unto his building up.

True wisdom is either hidden from a man or revealed to him; and a man of philosophy is either hopelessly enthralled by the unknown god or hopefully enraptured by the revealed God in Jesus Christ.

Christ is the only true philosopher’s Stone, if there ever was one – whom the builders of such conceptions have themselves rejected from the beginning. The torch of Prometheus is lit with the fire of hell, and its wisdom glows with the sickly dying light of the fallen one.

The beyond of the merely reasoning mind is the void of the Word of God. But the man enlightened by the faith of Jesus Christ no longer has need of such an elusive beyond to be concieved of in his mind; for he is now present in the revelation of the Word, who is very near to him, even in his mouth and in his heart.

Our known reality is not the manifestation of abstract concepts from the beyond of true reality: rather, true reality has been manifestly revealed in our known reality in the Man Christ Jesus, of whom the most excellent philosophical concepts are only derivative, and speak only faintly. Reality is right before us; and He who defines it must open our eyes to begin to see Him as He is.

Experience is the shadow of reality, and concepts are the shadow of experience. Therefore, mere concepts of God are only a shadow of a shadow; and have no use without the experience of what is real in God.

We do not reason to God to open men’s hearts, we reason from God, who opens men’s hearts.


“Now, since we do not live with our soul stripped bare, but, on the contrary, have it clothed over, as it were, with the veil of the flesh, our soul has the mind as a sort of eye which sees and has the faculty of knowing and which is capable of receiving knowledge and having understanding of things which are.
It does not, however, have knowledge and understanding (by) itself, but has need of one to teach it; so, let us approach that Teacher in whom there is no falsehood and who is the truth. Christ is the subsistent wisdom and truth and in Him are all the treasures of hidden knowledge.”
– John of Damascus


“After reading the doctrines of Plato, Socrates or Aristotle, we feel the specific difference between their words and Christ’s is the difference between an inquiry and a revelation.”
– Joseph Parker


True Philosophy – John Of Damascus

“Philosophy is a love of wisdom. But, true wisdom is God. Therefore, the love of God, this is the true philosophy.”
– John of Damascus

Alpha & Omega

“I am the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end.”
Revelation 22:13

Jesus Christ precedes all causes, and exceeds all ends.

Let His revelation determine our reason,
Let His faith determine our knowledge,
Let His hope determine our wisdom,
Let His love determine our life.
For from the least to the greatest, these all proceed from Him; and their end is in Him.