Exposure, Dismantlement, Judgement.

This is regarding a subject I wrote briefly about and emailed to a handful of people on November 4th, 2016 – four days before the U.S. Presidential Election. I was given a sense from God that this would be a turning point for that nation: in the sense that the wickedness and corruption in high places, which has long only been rumoured of, would begin to become exposed in the open before the eyes of many. For those who can see, this exposure has been occurring mostly behind the scenes, and is now beginning to cascade into the wider public eye.

This is NOT to presume that the people of that nation as a whole will subsequently endure in righteousness, as some have extrapolated in recent years. It is far too late for that. The exposure of the corruption amongst the earthly rulers does not necessarily bring about the nation-wide repentance of the land’s inhabitants (though let us pray that many still turn from this world of wickedness to seek the true and living God). For there would first have to occur a great breakup of such a large nation if any of the subsequent factions were to be spared even a portion of the wrathful rod that still approaches them from on high. And this breakup might well happen (the most peaceful option) – but I speak from my own sight in that matter: and the ruthless machine of centralization might simply backlash and forcibly gobble everything up first instead.

In either case, the decline and fall of America has not been stopped, it has merely taken a detour from what many had presumptuously expected and others had popishly prognosticated would dramatically happen literally any day. Yet there is still great judgement coming; for such a nation simply cannot endure for long as a whole: there are simply too many opposing peoples under one governing umbrella for it to remain united. The melting pot is melting, to say the very least. Some States will doubtless taste more fire than others; and those who gaslit the masses into submission unto Baal will suffer greatly in the end.

Exposure,

Dismantlement,

Judgement.

The following is what I wrote in 2016, including Nahum chapter 3, which is most relevant to the time. If you read anything on the subject, read Nahum. Nahum says it all.

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November 4th, 2016

God often exposes the sins of a wicked nation, its leaders, and its people before He judges it. We are seeing this happen before our very eyes and would do well to be found walking righteously before the Living God, obeying His voice fully and faithfully in such an hour. For this affects every one of us in one way or another.

Heaviest of all will be His hand against those who profess loyalty to His Holy Name yet do not repent of iniquity and turn from their every idol, actively abiding in Him.

Be found as the disciplined, purified flock, the remnant of His inheritance; who answer the call of heaven with obedience in order that they might dine with Jesus at His feast as the ones whom He calls friends. If Babylon has not left your heart, you have not left Babylon; and you thereby partake in her sins unto partaking in her judgement. We all will stand before the judgement seat of Christ, who discerns the thoughts and intents of the heart.

NAHUM 3:

Woe to the bloody city! All of it is a lie, all of plunder; the prey is not withdrawn. The sound of a whip, and the sound of rattling of a wheel, and a galloping horse, and of a bounding chariot. The horseman lifts up both the gleam of the sword and the lightning of the spear, and many are slain, and there are a mass of dead bodies, and no end of corpses; they stumble on their dead bodies, because of the many harlotries of the well favored harlot, the mistress of sorceries who sells nations by her harlotries, and families by her sorceries.

“Behold, I am against you,” declares Jehovah of Hosts, “and I will uncover your skirts over your face, and I will cause the nations to see your nakedness, and the kingdoms your shame. And I will cast filth on you and will disgrace you. And I will set you as a spectacle. And it shall be that all those who look on you shall flee from you and shall say, ‘Nineveh is laid waste; who shall weep for her? From where shall I seek comforters for you?'”

Are you better than No-Amon that dwelt among the Nile branches, waters surrounding her, whose rampart was the sea, the waters her wall? Ethiopia and Egypt were her strength, yea, without end. Put and Lubim were among your helpers. Yet she went into exile; she went into captivity. Also her young ones were dashed to pieces at the head of all the streets, and they cast lots for her honored ones, and all her great ones were bound in chains. You also shall be drunken; you shall be hidden; you also shall seek a fortress from the enemy. All your fortresses are fig trees with the firstfruits; if they are shaken, then they shall fall on the mouth of the eater. Behold, your people are women in your midst; the gates of your land shall surely be opened to your enemies; the fire shall devour your bars.

Draw water of the siege for you! Strengthen your fortifications! Go into the clay and tread in the mortar! Make the mold strong! Fire will devour you there. The sword shall cut you off. It will eat you up like the locust larvae. Make yourself as many as the larvae; multiply yourself like the locusts. You have increased your merchants above the stars of the heavens; the locust larvae shall strip off and fly away. Your princes are like the locusts, and your officials are a swarm of locusts that camp in the hedges in the cold day. The sun rises and they flee, and the place where they are is not known.

Your shepherds slumber, O king of Assyria; your nobles are lying down. Your people are scattered on the mountains, and no one is gathering. There is no healing for your fracture; your wound is severe. All who hear of your report shall clap the hand over you, for on whom has your wickedness not continually passed?

(Nahum chapter 3)

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Those who observe vanities of idolatry forsake their faithfulness; but I will sacrifice to You with the voice of thanksgiving; I will fulfill that which I have vowed. Salvation belongs to Jehovah!
Jonah 2:8-9 (LITV)

A Sign In Paris

If this isn’t a sign for France, and to the world – on multiple levels – I don’t know what is.

Rome is burning.

Forshadowing of Babylon.

The tower falls every time.

Music: To Worship, Uplift, Distract, Or Subvert

A comparison of four classical composers, with observations on how their music either helps uplift the soul to God, or draws the mind down to wallow in the things below.


1 – Johann Sebastian Bach: The Harmony Of Logos


Examples of Bach:

Brandenberg Concerto No.3:

Bach’s beautiful choral arrangement of the Lutheran hymn “By The Rivers Of Babylon” (“An Wasserfl├╝ssen Babylon”):

Toccata & Fugue:

Bach’s music describes in vivid sonic detail the reality of God’s divine order and eternal truth. There is seemingly no phrase or note in his music not written to this one end; all has distinct purpose. There is no waste; and everything is addressed in a most dignified manner. In Bach’s music, the Light is spoken of with awe and reverence; and the darkness is spoken of within the context of God’s mastery over all. There is pure joy in the Lord, with nothing trite or frivolous. There is pure fear of the Lord, with no hint of despair. There is no glorying in man’s thoughts or strength; but much rather in God’s wisdom and power.

Bach is (among other things) the great exegete of the keyboard, and his extensive repertoire lays out for us, as it were, the divinely appointed boundaries of every note’s potential use in relation to another, with every measure of his many compositions effortlessly reflecting his own remark that “harmony is close to Godliness”. There is no flirtation with musical subversion or mindless dissonance; and the occasional unusual sound is employed only to serve the well-being of the hearer as far as it reflects the realities of God’s truth within the created order of the music.

“The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.”
– Johann Sebastian Bach

How well indeed did his music fulfill that saying!
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2 – George Frideric Handel: The Sound Of Majesty


Examples of Handel:

Overture, from Messiah:

Comfort Ye My People, from Messiah:

Overture, from Alexander’s Feast of the Power of Music:

A contemporary and fellow countryman of Bach (though they never met), Handel’s music is hewn from the same substance, with an ever-present consciousness of honoring God’s glory. There is always a sense of divine majesty in his compositions, by which the sensitive hearer is at times made to feel that they tread on holy ground – and this without either pretension or any sense of overbearing forcefulness on the part of the music: it simply speaks for itself when played, as truth always does when uttered.

The instrumentation alone in his famous work “Messiah” can easily take one into the very holy of holies if the soul is prepared to heed its call; and the accompaniment of prophetic scriptures borne upon its heavenly melodies carries an anointing unparalleled in most hymnody. There is often a hush of awe which falls upon even the most secular of audiences when these pieces are performed in succession. That particular work was reported to have been written by Handel in the course of approximately 30 days (in its base form, without many of the large choral parts – still an astounding feat).
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3 – Ludwig Van Beethoven: The Self-Interest Of Man


Examples of Beethoven:

Piano Concerto No.1 – Allegro Con Brio:

Cello Sonata No.3 in A Major:

Beethoven’s music still lives within the world of reality and truth, but it often does very little to consciously acknowledge such. There is still an adherence to the orderliness and natural beauty of things; but the element of divine authority is replaced with a largely unanswered search for meaning. Vast portions of his compositions are dedicated to meander through the deep woods of a lonesomely reasoning mind; and their occasional discoveries, though useful, are usually not revelatory. There is natural light, but always the bright sun is hidden behind a blanket of cloud; and the divine is so distant that it need not be directly spoken of.

In Beethoven the transcendent is lost to long rabbit trails of thought, and, at times, impulsive little adventures in melody. Not that anything is ever objectionable to the hearing – there is still a clear appreciation for beauty – yet it is limited to created beauty, and seemingly not the Creator Himself. Beethoven does eventually come to an appropriately resolved end in his compositions; but we are usually left wondering what ultimate reason there was for much of the journey. There is a distinct sense of spiritual unfulfullment despite the typical excellency of his musical form.

One always remembers the feeling of Beethoven’s music; but only a few of his pieces leave a definite impression – and even where they do, all of his music is strongly laced with the sighing melancholy of humanism’s emptiness. Even where he breaks through his troubles into a happy theme, it is always with a certain dullness of heart. Even if the light is brilliant without, it is as though the eyesight remains dim from within. Any soul not lulled to a certain numbness by much of his music is left wanting for a warmth and wholeness that was not granted; and who now shall sing to that soul of the brighter Day?
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4 – Richard Wagner: The Madness Of Devils


Examples of Wagner:

Prelude of “Tristan und Isolde” – which has been cited by some as an early inspiration to Nietzsche’s trajectory of thought.* It is a daunting and tiresome listen:

The Ride of the Valkyries – known to often evoke in men a heightened desire for war and pointless worldly conquest:

Much of Wagner’s music (particularly as heard above) is the expression of the subversive amoral philosophy of will-to-power. There is no reality or truth there except whatever the soul desires to conquer and call its own. As an excellent example of this Satanic mindset, the starting notes of “The Ride Of The Valkyries” sound perfectly like the arousal of jealousy; and the ensuing journey is one of a constant blowing about in the swirling winds of the growing lust for power, which is the only meaning in this nihilistic worldview.

Therefore, its end is wanting of any real wholesome resolve; and throughout, the key signature changes frequently, but not often to a wholly related key. Its sense of mounting triumph has no source outside of what it has accomplished in itself by sheer will: the transcendent is drowned out completely by self-glory. At last, it crashes to an end after a swift tumble into darkness, having left the listener’s heart in great alarm. And after its echoes die off in the ears, one is left with no new thing to contemplate, no melody by which the soul is given a path toward the Logos of God. The divine is utterly cut off; the soul (if it has trusted the music) is left open to the first thought or spirit that may seek to lead it astray.

It is also worth noting that this Wagner, the composer, was a great personal influence upon Nietzsche, the philosopher; and a hefty portion of Wagner’s music certainly does seem to subvert divine order, just as the philosophy of that madman, leaving in its wake the chaotic void into which he himself no doubt gazed.
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There hasn’t been a time since the fall of man when music was not a battleground for men’s souls.
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Make a joyful noise to the LORD, all the earth; break forth into joyous song and sing praises!

Sing praises to the LORD with the lyre, with the lyre and the sound of melody!

With trumpets and the sound of the horn make a joyful noise before the King, the LORD!

Let the sea roar, and all that fills it; the world and those who dwell in it!
Let the rivers clap their hands; let the hills sing for joy together before the LORD, for He comes to judge the earth. He will judge the world with righteousness, and the peoples with equity.

Psalm 98:4-9

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*For some additional interesting information on this subject matter, listen to this interview which I came across recently. He lays out the history of the subversion of music in the late classical era quite well, and particularly touches upon the relationship between Wagner and Nietzsche.
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** I do not own any of the music or audio used in this post; it is herein used for reviewing purposes only. **

Quote On False Witness – Brett Kavanaugh

I was impressed by this man’s courage the other day.

“You have sown to the wind: I fear that for decades to come, the whole country will reap the whirlwind.”
– Brett Kavanaugh, SCOTUS appointee, addressing an unduly accusatory Senate Judiciary Committee, Sept 27, 2018

Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour.
Exodus 20:16

For they have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind: it hath no stalk: the bud shall yield no meal: if so be it yield, the strangers shall swallow it up.
Hosea 8:7

Woe to such a land.