Man Reasons, but God Reveals

…as it has been written, “Eye has not seen, and ear has not heard,” nor has it risen up into the heart of man, the things which God has prepared for those that love Him. But God revealed them to us by His Spirit, for the Spirit searches all things, even the depths of God. For who among men knows the things of a man, except the spirit of a man within him? So also no one has known the things of God except the Spirit of God. But we have not received the spirit of the world, but the Spirit from God, so that we might know the things that are freely given to us by God. Which things we also speak, not in words taught in human wisdom, but in words taught of the Holy Spirit, comparing spiritual with spiritual. But a natural man does not receive the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him, and he is not able to know, because they are spiritually discerned. But the spiritual one discerns all things, but he is discerned by no one. For who has known the mind of the Lord? Who will teach Him? But we have the mind of Christ.
1 Corinthians 2:9-16 (LITV)

True divine knowledge is not found merely by the reason of the mind; it must be revealed by God. For the true knowledge of God is to know the person of God Himself; and what He has prepared for those who love Him does not enter into the hearts and minds of men – the scripture indeed testifies that it cannot. Rather, the very mind of Christ must enter into a man so that he may discern the things of God.

Those who suppose to uncover God simply by force of reason despise that His method is revelation. Many to whom something of Him has been truly revealed are tempted to flatter themselves by methodically reasoning out what truly was revealed to them of the Everlasting God. This is a snare; and those who step in it prove that they still gladly wander back to partake of the tree of gnosis. Ever has this been the bane of many a man of God throughout the ages: that a revelation becomes buried in the unending interperative jargon of his vain mind, until little more remains than an empty husk of what once bore real and tangeable fruit. The binding up of revelation into the constraints of human reasoning effectively chalks up the work of the Spirit to a mere human exertion. This is made to appear as humility, but truly it is a theft of God’s glory in how He makes Himself known.

Man in his vanity considers reason the great pillar of objectivity, until God ruins him by revelation. For truly the things of God cannot be revealed by a man’s reasoning faculties, but only to them; and even then, our mere thoughts still cannot contain the very substance of God’s Life: for the true knowledge of God consists in fellowship with His person by the power of His Life guiding our steps and conforming us to His image. Therefore, if we shall reason, let it be by the revelation of His Spirit in accordance with the scriptures, and not by our isolated thoughts in accordance with some great philosopher; for God reasons with men by the revealing of Himself. And if we yet lack in the revelation of His person, why do we continue to reason within ourselves, as though we should find it there?

But if any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask from God, who gives to all freely and with no reproach, and it will be given to Him. But let him ask in faith, doubting nothing. For the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea, being driven by wind and being tossed. For do not let that man suppose that he will receive anything from the Lord: he is a double-souled man, not dependable in all his ways.
James 1:5-8 (LITV)

Man reasons within himself, but God reveals Himself to men.

11 comments on “Man Reasons, but God Reveals

  1. Tim Shey says:

    The title of this post reminds me of a Yiddish proverb:

    “Men plan and God laughs.”

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  2. […] This is from Words from the Crucible: […]

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  3. Tim Shey says:

    From Wikipedia:

    “The phrase “Man proposes, but God disposes” is a translation of the Latin phrase “Homo proponit, sed Deus disponit” from Book I, chapter 19, of The Imitation of Christ, a 15th-century book by the German cleric Thomas à Kempis. A few modernized and paraphrased Bible translations use it as a translation of Proverbs 19:21, but the original of that verse is longer and more elaborate.

    “The phrase was also put on a Dutch commemorative medal celebrating the Elizabethan England Protestant victory in 1588 over the Catholic Spanish Armada.”

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  4. Tim Shey says:

    You could also title this post “The Tree of Knowledge versus the Tree of Life” (reason versus revelation).

    In my life as a Christian, I solemnly assure you, revelation is what separates the men from the boys.

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    • I’m seeing that.

      Everything in man’s experience goes back to those two trees: it is the ever-present choice between the corrupting mixture of self-will (good and evil), and the perfecting completeness of God’s will (Life).

      For the lost man, earthly (including demonic) reasoning is his revelation. For the found man, heavenly revelation must evermore become his reasoning.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. …and not merely his reasoning, but that by which he acts in faith. For revelation which bears no fruit in action has been received in vain.

    Liked by 1 person

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